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Greater kudu born at Milwaukee County Zoo

Greater kudus are one of the tallest antelope and are native to the bush and forested parts of eastern and southern Africa, according to the zoo.
Kudu Calf 08-2023-0043276.JPG
Posted at 1:16 PM, Sep 11, 2023

The Milwaukee County Zoo welcomed a baby greater kudu into the world, staff announced Monday.

The calf was born on Aug. 5 to mother Imani and father Hasani. Staff named the calf Chula, which means cute in Spanish.

Kudu Calf 08-2023-0043273.JPG

Greater kudus are one of the tallest antelope and are native to the bush and forested parts of eastern and southern Africa, according to the zoo. They have vertical stripes running down their sides, and their horns can reach about four feet long with 2.5-inch twists.

Kudu Calf 08-2023-0043293.JPG

You can see Chula at the zoo's African Waterhole habitat starting Sept. 11 weather permitting.

Read the full announcement below and watch video of the cutie at the top of this report.

Greater Kudu Born at the Milwaukee County Zoo

There’s a new addition to the African Waterhole habitat at the Milwaukee County Zoo — can you guess who? It’s a kudu!

A female greater kudu (pronounced “koo-doo”) calf was born Sat., Aug. 5 to mother Imani and father Hasani. The calf is named Chula, or “cute” in Spanish, and she was up and walking shortly after birth. The following day, Chula weighed 15.1 kg at her neonate exam.

Greater kudus are one of the tallest antelope and native to the dense bush and forested areas of eastern and southern Africa. Females are tawny-colored, and adult males are often more gray-brown — useful for camouflage from predators. Thin, white, vertical stripes run down their flank, while white markings and spots color their face. A crest of long hair runs from their neck down their entire back. But most prominent are the large, spiral horns on the adult males that enable them to spar with each other. Their horns can reach nearly 4 feet tall with 2 ½ inch twists!

Greater kudus are listed as a species of Least Concern in the wild by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). They’re browsers, and their diet can include leaves, grass, roots, and fruit. Chula is also nursing from Imani.

Now more than a month old, Chula continues to flourish, and as a first-time mom, zookeepers share that Imani is doing great and is very attentive to Chula. She’s Hasani’s second calf and hasn’t yet been introduced to him.

Beginning September 11, Chula will likely be seen daily in the African Waterhole habitat (weather permitting) — “practicing” her leaps!