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Second juror speaks out in Avery case: "I would have voted not guilty"

Two jurors in all voice concerns over verdict
Posted: 8:50 PM, Jan 05, 2016
Updated: 2016-01-13 11:53:41-05
Not one, but two jurors, are speaking out tonight about the 2005 murder trial that's taking the nation by storm.
 
Steven Avery's life, and trial, is now the subject of a Netflix documentary that questions his conviction for the murder of Teresa Halbach.
 
Richard Mahler sat through six weeks of the Avery trial, seeing every scrap of evidence presented.
 
Now he says, had he not been excused for a family emergency, the outcome may have been different.
 
For Mahler, there are simply too many issues with the Avery trial to ignore.
 
"I would've voted not guilty," says Mahler, a decade after Avery is sentenced to life in prison for Halbach's murder.
 
Mahler's removal from the jury meant he'd have no say on close to two months worth of evidence, and four hours of jury room deliberations that he claims included talks of vote trading.
 
"Making a Murderer" filmmakers describe vote trading as talks of "voting guilty" for one particular count in exchange for a "not guilty" vote on a different count.
 
When questioned by WTMJ-TV reporters Tuesday, Mahler replied, "that sounds about right with what was happening on the jury before we wrapped it up for the first day."
 
He says he didn't know it then, but by his account, one of the jurors was related to a Manitowoc County Sheriff's Deputy.
 
"When we got into the jury room, the father of the Manitowoc County Sheriff Deputy sat there with his arms folded," says Mahler, "and said, 'he's guilty as all hell.'"
 
And Mahler apparently isn't alone.
 
On NBC's Today Show Tuesday morning, the women behind "Making a Murderer" claimed another anonymous juror tells them Avery deserves a new trial--far away from Wisconsin.
 
"They believe that Steven was framed by law enforcement," says filmmaker Laura Ricciardi.
 
"This person feels relieved that they got it off their chest, and I talk to this person," says Mahler, "and they're scared."